Diamond Kite

11-14 year olds | two hours

Get a great kite up and flying for less than £5, and your teen can say they made it themselves!

What You'll Need

  • strong thread
  • packaging tape
  • big bin bag or plastic shopping bag
  • 2 wooden dowels (1/3 cm thick, 50 cm long)
  • stickers to decorate
  • black marker
  • scissors
  • ruler

Instructions

1. Lay the two sticks next to each other. Using a ruler, measure the centre and quarter marks on each stick. Mark these with a black marker.
2. Lay flat a large piece of plastic. If your bin bags are smaller, cut them flat and tape them together with packaging tape.
3. Arrange the dowels on top of the plastic, one vertical and the other horizontal, forming a cross.
4. Make sure that the horizontal dowel crosses the vertical down at the quarter point, not in the middle.
5. Make large dots marking the intersection and the ends of each stick. Take sticks off the plastic.
6. Using a ruler, connect the four outer dots with a black marker.
7. Cut out the shape with scissors.
8. Place the dowels back on the plastic. Secure each dowel end to the point with a piece of packaging tape. To do this, stick half the tape under the plastic (on the front of the kite). Pull the rest of the piece over the point and secure over each dowel end.
9. With the rest of your plastic, cut ten strips of plastic, about 20 cm in length. These will make up your kite’s tail. Tie their ends together.
10. Tie the tail around the bottom dowel—in front of the plastic. This will keep your kite balanced and sailing high.
11. Turn your kite over. See the intersection of the sticks? Make two small holes diagonal from each other in the plastic. They should be on either side of the intersection. Use a sharpened pencil to make the holes.
12. Thread string through the two holes, looping to secure the sticks together.
13. Continue unwrapping the string until you have about 16 meters. Wrap this around a strong dowel or pencil.
14. You are ready to fly your kite! Decorate with stickers if you want.

Tags: model making, games, outdoors


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